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Voter's guide: City council candidates

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We asked all city council candidates the same questions and gave them each 600 words with which to answer. They got to use those words however they thought was best.

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The questions are:

1. Why are you running for city council?

2. How do you think the council has handled development within Rosemount?

3. After the failed referendum vote in April, how do you think the city should proceed with plans for the Outdoor Athletic Complex and the former St. Joseph's campus?

4. What are the most important issues facing Rosemount?

5. What is a personal issue you would like to address if elected to the city council?

Candidates are listed as much as possible in alphabetical order. However, because some responses were significantly shorter than others that was not always possible.

Several candidates did not respond despite several attempts on our part to contact them.

Amy Ammann

Why are you running? 

I am running for city council because I have a vision for a vibrant downtown that provides local jobs for our citizens; safe, friendly neighborhoods and a strong civic partnership that protects the vulnerable and I want to be part of the decision making process that can make that happen.  I want our citizens, young and old to have the opportunity to live, learn, work and play in Rosemount.  I want to provide the opportunity and the venues for our citizens to spend their time and money in Rosemount.  

How has development been handled? 

I think the overall vision is on the right track.  I don't believe that the threat of eminent domain was the right way to go but the end result will be a positive for Rosemount.  There are a lot of vacant retail spaces in the city that we need to fill while we are working on the redevelopment of downtown.  I met with City Administrator Dwight Johnson and I think the development in process will be a great addition to Rosemount.  I do believe that the city needs the Outdoor Athletic Complex and the former St. Joseph's campus.

What about St. Joseph's and the outdoor athletic complex? 

I am not sure what options are available for the Outdoor Athletic Complex and the former St. Joseph's campus, but I do believe we should pursue whatever options there are.  The building of the athletic complex and the transformation of St. Joseph's doesn't have to be done all at once, they can be done incrementally.  The former St. Joseph's campus is a piece of Rosemount history and whatever it is used for in the future will only enhance the city.  And the Athletic Complex is a place for our adults and kids to play.  At a time when obesity is on the rise, it is more important than ever that anyone who wants to participate in athletics has the opportunity and facilities to do so.  We can use these facilities to host tournaments and cultural events that will bring people and money into Rosemount. 

What are the city's most pressing issues?

I think the most important issue facing our citizens is the economic crisis.  I believe we have to increase the business base in order to lower property taxes.  We also have to provide opportunities and activities for our Seniors, families and children.  We want our citizens to stay in Rosemount for their entertainment, shopping, business and sporting needs.  We need to provide activities for all age groups to enjoy in Rosemount.  Ultimately I believe that the most important issues facing Rosemount and its citizens are the ones that affect the pocketbook.

And a personal issue?

I believe that all the issues facing Rosemount and its citizens are personal issues for me, especially economic growth and providing our citizens with the opportunity and facilities to live, learn, work and play in Rosemount.

Kurt Bills

Why are you running?

It is a civic duty to serve in various capacities for our republic to remain strong. I am drawn to this duty, and I am committed to Rosemount. Each day I invest in our community while teaching and working with our young people. Each morning, and every evening, I bike through our streets going to and from work. Our community and quality of life is why my family lives in Rosemount. With my knowledge of governance and economics, I am confident in my abilities to serve as a councilman.?

How has development been handled?

The current City Council has established responsible goals for 2008-2009 that I support and can be viewed on the City's website. We need to have a discussion on the specifics of "balanced growth", and there should be citizen input on when, where, and what amenities are added. Progress is something that I am glad previous generations did not stand in the way of. Our standard of living is built on the shoulders of generations past. We should show respect for that without losing sight of posterity.

What about St. Joseph's and the outdoor athletic complex? 

If the public said no then the only way to proceed is trying to find private funding for the venture. Public decision should not be circumvented through any means. Governments at all levels enjoy when the citizen says yes, why do they have a hard time hearing no? The council should work with the Chamber of Commerce, and other organizations, to try to match contributors and potential partners with their goals if they wish to proceed.

The best hope for St. Joe's will be entrepreneurial individuals. I think St. Joseph's would make a wonderful charter school or magnet school for district 196. We have a very progressive superintendent, and should approach the district to discuss their possible needs for future sites. Could a sale, trade or lease take place? We should investigate the rent possibilities from leasing the building. Could it create enough revenue to pursue the Athletic Complex goal? I am positive that, like Knowlan's, the building will be matched with a great idea.

What are the city's most pressing issues?

The most important short-term issues facing Rosemount is the efficient handling of St. Joe's campus and managing downtown redevelopment plans; specifically, how to attract businesses to occupy the space available.

The most important medium-term issues are economic development of commercially and industrially zoned areas. Attracting quality jobs to Rosemount will be crucial. Securing the update of the transportation interchange at Hwy. 52 and CR. 42 is also a critical medium-term issue, and one that is linked to economic development.

In the long-term, there is no greater issue than UMore Park. What an incredible opportunity for the city. Making sure that citizens have an opportunity to voice concerns, share ideas, and are adequately informed will be critical as the project draws closer.

And a personal issue?

There would be two, fiscal discipline and enhancing relationships between the city council and educational institutions in Rosemount.

Ben Burdick

Why are you running?

I love this city. When my wife and I moved here with our family, we specifically picked Rosemount because of its hometown feel. I want to preserve Rosemount's rich heritage, strong community activity and to truly be a servant of the people.

I believe Rosemount can keep the wonderful hometown feel we all enjoy and still accommodate the coming growth. Change is best done when city council and its constituents work together to find solutions to their problems.

As an IT Project Manager I work everyday to inform, listen to and communicate the issues regarding how a project can best be completed. It is communication that I believe is lacking currently with Rosemount's city council and something I know I can help provide. Additionally, I feel that I bring unique experience with project and budget management. We will face important budget decisions as a council and I will make sure that we are efficient with taxpayers' dollars.

Lastly, I am running for City Council because I enjoy working with others and listening to their opinions where we can develop solutions together.

How has development been handled?

I think the City Council needed to focus more on truly listening to their constituents. Many people are not happy with the plans being made for downtown, especially with the three-story buildings.

The current redevelopment strategy is based on the idea that by increasing residential housing downtown, this will also increase business activity. The strategy should instead focus on what types of shops we should have downtown to attract the kind of activity we need so our businesses can thrive.

What about St. Joseph's and the outdoor athletic complex?

First, the city should separate these two projects. It isn't right that they lumped the choice in an all or nothing option. One issue isn't dependent on the other and they should be separate.

Second, they need to communicate to the community the exact purpose and outcome of these projects. Some saw this vote as a chance for the city to raise their taxes when our economy is already in a decline. The benefits were not clearly defined and even today there is still some confusion over these issues.

Lastly, make the opportunity to vote on this issue during the standard Election Day in November. It will increase the participation of the vote.

What are the city's most pressing issues?

Being new to Rosemount I have spent hours listening to Rosemount residents about their perspectives and the issues that face our community. What I've found to be the most important issues were the Redevelopment of downtown and what we do with the UMore Property. How we approach and move forward with these issues will determine Rosemount's future.

Our downtown redevelopment should have appealing shops that will attract people to our downtown and keep our small hometown feeling. The UMore Property will allow us to expand. If done right we can keep our small town feel as well as increase our tax base and offer more job opportunities in our great city. But - we must include voters, encourage them to come and talk with the council, share their ideas and be involved in the decision making process. If we communicate goals, plans and objectives better with voters they will be more intertwined in the decision making process which is vital on a local level.

And a personal issue?

Improved open communication with Rosemount's constituents, personal property rights and enforcement of city ordinances. Only through communicating effectively and respecting each other will Rosemount continue to be the great city it is.

Chris Carson

Why are you running?

Rosemount is a great place to live. However, as a rapidly growing community, we're facing some serious challenges. How can we accommodate our growth while retaining the small town feel that makes Rosemount so unique? How can we provide for the needs of today's families and businesses, without breaking the town's budget?

I believe the city council needs strong leadership. I also believe that the council needs to do a better job of engaging and communicating with the people who are affected by their decisions.

My decision to run is out of a concern that the council isn't made up of individuals with a narrow agenda. I think it's important to have a candidate with an open mind that wants to look at all sides of an issue to determine what's the best course of action.

How has development been handled?

The council as a whole has shown some real vision when it comes to its ability to attract new businesses and with the UMore partnership. They've also done a good job in expanding transportation options and in building the town library.

However, I think there's been some failure in presenting a proactive vision for the city's future. The Council needs to set and communicate clear priorities, while working harder to keep citizens informed of pros and cons of any given action.

What about St. Joseph's and the outdoor athletic complex?

First of all, in today's economic climate, I believe it's tough to propose a property tax increase that the people would embrace without question. This goes back to my point about setting and communicating clear priorities for the city.

The two projects should've been discussed and voted on separately from the very beginning. The reality is there is a shortage of athletic fields for the all of the sports programs in our growing community. While many parents know this, the community in general might not. This communication gap gets filled with erroneous rhetoric that it's only being considered due to a few beer league softball players angling for a nicer place to play. In the case of St. Joseph's, it wasn't clear that the investment would have been enough to deliver its intended use, as well as bring the structure into compliance with building codes.

Extra-curricular activities, whether they are sports, band, choir, debate, theatre, or church organizations, are integral part to a community and to childhood development. Unfortunately, the two projects were lumped together, forcing an all or nothing proposition. My plan would be to offer multiple scenarios for the completion of the projects individually for the citizens to endorse or vote down.

What are the city's most pressing issues?

The biggest issue is addressing the needs of a growing community, while retaining the small town feel, appeal, and culture that makes Rosemount special. At the same time we need to successfully plan for the future of our community and environment.

I will bring fiscal discipline and pragmatism to the Council. I'll help to develop and communicate clear priorities based on the needs and concerns of Rosemount's citizens. I'll work hard to improve transparency in the Council's decision-making process and to encourage citizens' involvement in determining the direction of our city government. With a diverse and expanding population, the needs and wants of every citizen will vary. While not everyone will be happy with every decision, everyone should be given the opportunity to have his or her voice heard.

And a personal issue?

While I certainly have my own opinions and ideas on certain issues, I don't have a specific or personal agenda to drive. If elected, I will be open to all opinions, and take all sides into consideration before I vote on an issue.

David Durigan

Why are you running?

I am running for City Council because I am most concerned about is

attracting and retaining business in Rosemount. I want to continue to create a pro business environment. Lower property taxes, higher property values, more local amenities, and conveniences are all things that will fall into place if we can attract new and retain existing business in Rosemount.

How has development been handled?

I am not unhappy with Rosemount's progress in the past few years.

Rosemount is a great place to live and it has so much more potential for

growth. I don't want us to become Apple Valley or Eagan. I would like us to

capitalize on our own unique features.

What about St. Joseph's and the athletic complex?

I don't think raising taxes is the best way to go on this issue. I would

like to see both projects separated and work them individually. Volunteering and cooperative efforts should not be off the table. If there is a way to fit them into the budget without raising taxes, I will find it.

What are the city's most pressing issues?

The most important issues facing Rosemount are Attracting and maintaining business, Better highways and freeways, keeping track of foreclosure properties and making sure they are properly maintained until they are resold and Completing the down town revitalization projects

And a personal issue?

Transportation is one of the most important issues facing Rosemount and neighboring cities in this area of the South Metro. Rosemount isn't the most

convenient suburb to the main 494/694 infrastructure. In my opinion, this is affecting the desirability for business to locate in Rosemount. And, it makes our commutes longer. If we don't come up with a plan now, where will we be

in 10 years? If I have anything to say about things, I would like to see a plan for the next 10 years that includes widening or adding highways and freeways to this area of the south metro. In order to accomplish this, we need to work with the state, neighboring cities, and Dakota County to recognize this issue.

David Ganfield

Why are you running?

Public Service has been important in our family through 3 generations. I feel strongly that we need to have a Council that will not only be responsive to our constituents, but also responsible for the future of the City. I believe the average citizen wants to see solutions to the everyday problems households are dealing with as well as the problems facing the community we live in. I have been a person who successfully works with others to find solutions to those problems.

How has development been handled?

I believe they have done a good job, but by the continued rumblings in the area, could have done better. The issue of eminent domain has taught everyone that better communication and understanding will be done in the future.

What about St. Joseph's and the athletic complex?

During these tough economic times, things will have to slow down on these topics and we will have to focus on the basics of providing necessary services to our citizens first. A vision needs to be established with an achievable goal in making improvements to our community.

What are the city's most pressing issues?

Growth and Redevelopment. UMORE Park and the aging demographics will be the greatest issues facing Rosemount. Growing pains of cities is not a new issue. It has been happening for decades, we can learn from other cities that have dealt with these types of issues. How we handle those issues requires common sense and understanding, along with keeping the citizens and businesses involved and educated about the future vision of Rosemount.?

And a personal issue?

To establish a clear plan for the future of where we will be in 10-20 years and insuring the growth will be within our means. To do this we need to work closely with the business community on what there needs and plans for the future are.

Malia Ellefson

Why are you running?

I was answering an ad from the Chimes of Freedom, which stated that they "needed lots of residents to run for city council in November". I feel that I could make a difference. I was call chair for selecting a pastor of Augustana Lutheran Church in Minneapolis. I enjoyed this type of leadership.

How has development been handled?

I think for the most part the council has done a good job.

What about St. Joseph's and the outdoor athletic complex?

I think we should possibly look to other businesses in town as a partnership to get this job done.

What are the city's most pressing issues?

Because of the increase in population, we'll need more police, firemen and more schools in the future.

And a personal issue?

I have been going to council meetings and I have met with the city administrator to find out what the issue are in Rosemount. I feel that it is very important to listen to what the concerns are of the residents and address these issues. Communication is very important. I would like to see St. Joseph Church as a cultural and arts center --keep the church as an historical marker.

Kevin Grass

Why are you running?

Because I don't feel that the city is going in the right direction especially with eminent domain.

How has development been handled?

They've been too involved. They need to let the businesses come to them.

What about St. Joseph's and the outdoor athletic complex?

That's two separate agendas. Once the economy comes back we can use city money to finish the athletic complex.

What are the city's most pressing issues?

Bringing in more businesses either ma and pa shops or things like Wal-mart.

And a personal issue?

I would personally like to eliminate train noise and look at bridges as a solution to that.

Todd Hendry

Why are you running?

To make a difference, I believe the current administration has not fulfilled its duty.

How has development been handled?

Fair, development and growth is inevitable. Some projects, I believe, could have been more diplomatic, such as the take over of Dr. Hansen's property. I don't think a city should use eminent domain unless it's absolutely necessary. Then selling it to a developer? That's just wrong.

What about St. Joseph's and the outdoor athletic complex?

They should do nothing, the residents have spoken. That's the problem with the current administration; they don't listen to the people. It can be brought to a referendum in the future if desired.

What are the city's most pressing issues?

Growth. The city needs to be responsible about not growing to fast and be more concerned about what its citizens want.

And a personal issue?

Curb spending on projects and new assets when the current assets are in perfect order.

Fredrick Hrbek

Why are you running?

I believe every resident should be active in their community. In recent months I am unhappy with the way the council has represented us. If elected, it would be an honor to represent the people of Rosemount.

How has development been handled?

I don't think we have that "small town feel" anymore. In the next few years there will be many changes with UMore Park itself. We need to ensure they grow with the way we want Rosemount to grow!

What about St. Joseph's and the outdoor athletic complex? 

They would have had a much better chance had they voted on that one issue by itself rather than attaching other agendas with it. Second; The council should ask the people what they would like to see happen. I'm sure they would get many interesting comments and ideas.

What are the city's most pressing issues?

Growth, safety, infusion of businesses and good paying jobs, and better transportation connecting Rosmount with surrounding cities.

And a personal issue?

Improving handicapped accessibility for the local businesses as well as the city. An example of good accessibility is the Walgreens. Also all roads must have curb access where the corner of one street intersects another at mid-block; such as behind Cub Foods.

Conni Jensen

Why are you running?

The city council as it is, listens but doesn't hear what the residents are saying. The council turns a deaf ear. I will listen and hear residents. I care for people and they deserve to be heard. I will also do further research on issues if needed.

How has development been handled?

Badly. I have lived in many other areas including Lakeville, Bloomington, Inver Grove Heights and Minneapolis. I have observed, evaluated and put the knowledge I have about such to see that research hasn't been done by the city or council.

What about St. Joseph's and the outdoor athletic complex?

No, with the economy the it is. There are other complexes not far away. Kids don't use the skate park the city built, now.

What are the city's most pressing issues?

City taking responsibility for wrong property lines. City taking responsibility for their mistakes.

And a personal issue?

Is a resident safe from being forced out of their home or being forced to endure from the city for wrong property to correct at their cost not city. Wrongful government waste spending in Rosemount.

Charles Koehnen

Why are you running?

I have been unhappy with the direction the City of Rosemount is going and I have been hearing other citizens complain that they are unhappy also. I would like to work to make sure that the decisions that are made move the city in a direction that is supported by the citizens of Rosemount.

How has development been handled?

I think the council has made some bad decisions which have caused the loss of longstanding businesses, lost money and angered many citizens. One example is their decision to use eminent domain.

What about St. Joseph's and the outdoor athletic complex?

The City should not try and package the Athletic Complex with the use of the St. Joseph's campus. There is a real need for an Athletic Complex and I think the people would have supported the Athletic Complex but were unwilling to vote yes on a proposal that included substantial funds for an Art Center.

What are the city's most pressing issues?

We need to attract businesses to our community and we need to manage development in a fiscally responsible realistic manner.

And a personal issue?

I would like to see citizens more informed and involved in the issues and decisions that affect them and the city.

Barry Lindahl

Why are you running?

The citizens of Rosemount need (a common man with common sense) representative on the council that will listen to them and present their ideas. I will be the link that they have been missing in the past. Without these city residents, we wouldn't have a city or a council. They deserve to be listened to with open ears.

Preservation of our farming community is getting lost. We need to look at more redevelopment by refurbishing old buildings rather than tearing them down and building new. Once they're destroyed you can't get them back.

How has development been handled?

A few of the recent developments in the city seem to be forced upon the residents. The residents have come to meetings and voiced their opinions to no avail. It is like the council has made their decisions to proceed without considering the common sense issues brought forth by the citizens they represent.

What about St. Joseph's and the outdoor athletic complex?

These two plans need to be reevaluated separately. Once they are separated, it needs to be determined which is a higher priority. Once that is determined, we need to work with the citizens to find a workable solution to proceed one project at a time. I believe that Common Sense, Slow, Steady, Affordable growth is what the residents are looking for.

What are the city's most pressing issues? 

Controlled growth, both business and residential. There are far too many vacant buildings in our city. Small businesses can be just as successful as large ones. We need to be concerned about growing too fast. It is much easier to recover from a small scale project that failed than a large one. I learned a long time ago, "If you don't have time to do it right, how will you find time to do it over?"

And a personal issue?

Code Enforcement, Garbage and Snow removal and Our aging population.    

Lee Morton

Why are you running?

To participate in this growing city of over 22000. With increased needs for police; a larger post office; water and sewer and streets, it becomes important how we plan for the future. Decisions made by the city will impact families for years to come.

How has development been handled?

I think the revitalizaion plan for downtown could be been centered around the new library; new post office; move the city hall to this area rather than building spaces for more business.  I think there is a real limitation on how many more businesses are going to be attracted to this area.

What about St. Joseph's and the outdoor athletic complex? 

With this referendum, the voters said they didn't want to spend the money on these projects. If these projects really are needed, perhaps more information and community involvement is needed.

What are the city's most pressing issues?

The growing need for additional infrastructure expenditures to accommodate this growing city of  over 22,000 is the most pressing.  How we pay for these additional expenditures and control growth in this city are the most important as I see it.

And a personal issue?

Again, the growth and budget for Rosemount in the future.

John Oxborough

Why are you running? 

I know as a long time resident of this city with experience on various boards and committees, I have come to realize the need for dedicated and experienced people in all phases of our city government. The time is now to take a look at how our city is to be governed in the future. With my dedication, knowledge and experience, I can help guide Rosemount towards a better future.

How has development been handled?

I think the council has done the best job that they can do.

What about St. Joseph's and the outdoor athletic complex? 

I feel there should have been two separate votes. The athletic complex would be a nice way to keep the youth busy along with adults in various activities and sports. With the ever expanding population in Rosemount, there is need for such a facility. There are fundraisers that can be done to help defray costs.

St. Joseph's campus is a different situation. It is a nice old landmark building that has not been updated with the times. It is not handicap accessible and the restrooms, in the basement, are hard to reach. The cost to renovate is tremendous, but with assistance (fundraisers, sponsorships, etc.) would be feasible. It could possibly be a location for our senior citizens to gather considering by 2013 the senior population will exceed our student population. I feel we should be looking at this building for multipurpose use.

What are the city's most pressing issues?

I feel that every issue in Rosemount is important. I would have to say in general, growing pains for the city are an ongoing issue. With trying to balance population and business to help the small town feel remain. Some businesses have left the city for other areas that are more accessible. As a city, we need to create the type of city that attracts and retains business and is a good place to call home.

And a personal issue?

The first issue that comes to mind is land use. Ensuring that the downtown redevelopment meets the needs of Rosemount citizens. The following are a focus of ongoing issues that are important: consider athletic complexes for youth, new housing for seniors, and residential development for growth within the city.

Jeff Weisensel

Why are you

running?

Since stepping down from the Planning Commission in 2004, friends and neighbors approached me to consider running for City Council based on my experience, leadership and willingness to serve my community. This year as more people asked me, I decided the time had come to step forward and further serve the citizens of Rosemount. Trained as a civil engineer, I have a practical understanding of municipal utilities and transportation infrastructure. With over twenty-six years in building construction, project management and property development experiences, I deliver daily on scopes, schedules and budgets.

How has

development been handled?

The council handles development in accordance with our Comprehensive Guide Plan. Our council is currently reviewing the updates to our current 2010 plan to reflect 2020 and 2030 growth trends and submit the plan to the Metropolitan Council for approval. The Metropolitan Council is responsible for the development plans in the seven county Twin Cities metro area to ensure the infrastructure is in place to accommodate the anticipated growth. The Guide reflects a large amount of input including the citizens of Rosemount. A large challenge for the council is the ability to execute business developments in order to increase the percentage of our city budget from business property taxes in lieu of the residents. I believe we are seeing some increase of businesses, but the city will struggle with private business investment in the current economic and financial environment.

What about St. Joseph's and the outdoor athletic complex? 

The city needs to understand why the referendum did not receive support. I believe a breakdown in communication occurred in what we desire and what became the referendum. Part of the small town feeling our community desires occurs at the ballparks and in the gathering areas in the community. I support our ability to collaborate with other agencies like DCTC and the University of Minnesota, our schools, as well as businesses like Flint Hills to secure land and share facilities that allow for the "best bang for our buck" with our tax dollars.

Private investment, driven by market demands, solves some but not all of the issues regarding space for youth activities including the Irish Dome and the recent opening of the Pond in the old Knowlan's store. Communication and striking a balance is key to any progress toward an Outdoor Athletic Complex and the utilization of the former St Joseph's campus.

What are the city's most pressing issues?

Four key challenges face Rosemount. The first challenge concerns the growth and development anticipated by our Comprehensive Guide Plan 2020 and 2030. Today's planning affects development like UMore Park and the areas east of Highway 52. Challenge two requires the continued fiscal and tax restraint addressing current and long-term growth affecting public safety, utility infrastructure and transportation. Challenge three requires encouraging and escalating a positive business climate for private investment that brought us Cub Foods, new restaurants and removed the "Coming Soon" sign with a thriving market place at the corner at Hwy 3 and 42. Challenge four looks to collaboration possibilities for public and private partners such as the University of Minnesota, Dakota County Technical College, ISD 196 and local businesses with the City to address open space and recreational activities.

And a personal issue?

I would offer I do not have a personal agenda or issue to address. My desire is to serve the citizens of Rosemount by utilizing my skills and talents to make our city a place for pride and progress. I would like to see the civic pride expressed by many of the candidates continue after the election by their involvement in community activities and organizations, challenging others to join them. These types of actions truly make the small town atmosphere we expect to find in Rosemount.

Michael Robert Smith

Why are you running?

I'm running for Rosemount City Council to stand for private property rights and economic development. Also, I'm opposed to raising taxes.

How has development been handled?

I opposed the use of eminent domain for downtown redevelopment. Also, I believe we have to do more to attract business and economic development.

What about St. Joseph's and the outdoor athletic complex? 

I think the two issues should be separated and revisited on their individual merits.

What are the city's most pressing issues?

The most important issues facing Rosemount are attracting more business and economic development and planning for long-range growth. Both of these can be accomplished while protecting the rights of its citizens.

And a personal issue?

The issue of banning backyard fire-pits has been in the news lately. I am pro backyard fire-pit.

John H. Zweber

Why are you running ?

Having lived in Rosemount for many years, I wanted to give back to the community and get more involved with what was happening in my city.

How has development been handled?

I think that they have handled it well.

What about St. Joseph's and the outdoor athletic complex?

The city needs more facilities to meet the growth. We should look at alternative ways to meet the need.

 What the are city's most pressing issues?

Maintaining the small town feel of Rosemount. Revitalizing downtown. Controlling growth

And a personal issue?

Hope for more convenient family oriented restaurants and shopping within the city.

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