Weather Forecast

Close
Advertisement

Time for prime time?

Email

If the members of Rosemount High School's site council are good salespeople, Irish football games, plays and other school events might soon start showing up on television.

Advertisement

Thanks to a deal with fiber-optic provider Fiber to the Home, if parents can sell enough subscriptions and upgrades RHS could soon have a fiber connection between its school building its stadium and a television channel on which to start broadcasting.

Site council president Becky Busho said the school-to-stadium fiber connection was on the group's wish list for fundraising projects. They had visions of broadcasting graduation, sporting events and the RHS marching band's annual competition.

"I thought that it would be so neat to be able to show the public more of what goes on," Busho said.

One of the site council members has a husband who works for FTTH, and the partnership grew from there. FTTH has offered the site council a $50 donation for each of the first 100 new subscriptions it gets and $75 for every new subscription after that. The council gets $25 for every subscription upgrade. If the council can raise $10,000, it gets the new fiber connection.

Busho hopes to get 150 new subscribers and 50 upgrades. That would cover the cost of the fiber line. Busho hopes to have everything sold by the end of summer.

There are still some questions to answer about the project. If everything goes through, the school will have to figure out how to run its own TV station.

"We've never been in the TV channel business before," RHS principal John Wollersheim said. "We'd have to do some creative things to figure out how to operate a channel, but it opens up a whole world of opportunity for us.

"It would be a fun question mark to solve."

There is a limited market, though. FTTH currently only offers service in two neighborhoods in Rosemount. Even if the council does not reach its $10,000 goal, though, it may see some benefit. The site council will keep whatever amount it raises.

"It's kind of a no-lose situation," Wollersheim said.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
randomness