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Deadline for Dakota County Master Gardener program is Oct. 1

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Love to learn about local horticulture and share this knowledge with the community? Apply to become a Master Gardener in 2011 and learn to identify heirloom flowers, grow new and heirloom vegetables. Trial new flower varieties not yet on the market. Research plants native to the area and determine how they can be best placed in gardens. Teach children how to plant and maintain a vegetable garden or teach neighborhood groups how to create and sustain their own community vegetable or rain garden.

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For over 30 years, the Dakota County Master Gardener program has grown and developed valuable ways to serve the community by utilizing the knowledge, skills and resources of local gardeners and the University of Minnesota through research-based projects. Master Gardeners serve the community through volunteer efforts that include designing and installing Habitat For Humanity home landscapes; working with Girl and Boy Scouts, other children's groups and local elementary schools; answering garden questions at local farmers' markets, garden centers and the County Fair; trialing new seeds each spring; hosting horticultural seminars, plant sales and expositions and teaching and sharing various aspects of horticulture and how they affect the environment and community. Dakota County Master Gardeners also have the unique opportunity to design, create and maintain six acres of display gardens in Rosemount devoted to outreach, research and education.

For more information on becoming a Master Gardener visit our web site at www.mg.umn.edu/becomeamg.html. To obtain application materials call Peggy at (651) 480-7700. The deadline to submit a program application is Friday, October 1, 2010.

The Dakota County Master Gardener Program is a community outreach program of the University of Minnesota Extension, with a mission to improve the quality of life and enhance the economy and the environment of the Dakota County community through education, applied research and the resources of the University of Minnesota.

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